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Easy DIY Project: Colorful Caddy

 

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I went to great measures to bring you this easy DIY project…36 inches multiplied by 5 to be exact!  That’s because it’s a colorful caddy made entirely of yardsticks.  Isn’t it fun?  What makes it even better is how little time, money and effort it takes to make one of these.  All you need is five yardsticks, wood glue and paint.

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You can make your caddy any size you want.  I just happened to make mine 16″ x 9″ to make sure I could cover it with my five yardsticks.  (Yardsticks, by the way, only cost about 69¢ each, so how great is that?)  Using the measurements on the sticks themselves, I cut eight 16-inch pieces, and four 9-inch pieces.  (Be sure to cut all four of your 9-inch pieces from the same yardstick, because 4 x 9 = 36, the exact length of a yardstick.)

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Once all your pieces are cut, put together two box frames using wood glue, and let it set.  I used a staple gun with tiny nails in addition to the wood glue to make sure it would stay together.

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You should now have two frames and four left over 16-inch pieces.

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Now, take those four pieces and lay them across the bottom of one of those frames, leaving little gaps on each side.  You don’t have to be too particular, just eye ball it and see what looks good.  Once you like it, glue down the pieces and nail them in as well, if you’ve decided to go the extra step.

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Now that you have the bottom portion of the tray done, take the top frame and decide where you want to put the handles.  I made mine four inches across and only about half an inch deep.  I traced it out in pencil and then cut it out.  I used a Dremmel, but you can use a jigsaw or what ever you have.  Just sand it down after you cut it so the handle is nice and smooth.  

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Now that you have your top and bottom portions done, you’re ready to assemble.  Decide how much of a gap you want to leave between the two frames, and use small pieces of wood, preferably cut at a 45-degree angle, as spacers that you will glue firmly into each corner.  I used some scrap wood that was in our garage.  If you don’t have any, I’m sure you can find some at the hardware store that are pre-cut in a triangular shape, which is ideal.  But, again, work with what you have.  Don’t worry about being too perfect with this project.  You want it to look a little rough.

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To make sure mine was spaced evenly, I used another piece of wood and rested it between the two frames while I was gluing each corner.  And I left it this way until the glue had dried.

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Now you’re ready to paint.  And this is kind of important… I wanted the yardstick measurements to come through and not be covered up entirely by the paint, so I watered down my paint considerably.  I made it the consistency of water colors.  Remember what that was like when you were a kid?  If you don’t, then start extra watery, and keep adding paint if it’s not the desired look.  You can always add more paint, but you can’t take it off, so start lighter than you think.  

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Voila!  Now your colorful caddy is all done!  Didn’t I tell you it was an easy DIY project?  Now take pictures and let me see how  yours turned out.  I asked my daughter to be a model for me and just hold the caddy while I took a picture showing the handles, and she pretty much claimed it after that.  You give her an inch, she takes a yard…err, FIVE yards!  Guess I’ll have to go make another one.

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Painting children's rooms, exterior murals, exterior paint, faux finishes, interior murals, canvases, holiday canvases, wooden plaques, beds, cabinets, dressers, furniture, party decorations, props, and other DIY crafts!